Ansel Adams, Cedric Wright and Friends

Ansel Adams & The Story of the Sierra Club Outings

,
From his first official experiences with the Sierra Club in 1927 through his final year as a board member in 1971, Ansel Adams cherished these outings. It was on these trips that he developed lifetime friendships over days of hiking, and nights of entertainment.
Ansel at LeConte Lodge, Yosemite Valley, California, c. 1921. Collection of Michael and Jeanne Adams.
Ansel Adams, “White House Ruin, Morning, Canyon De Chelly”

“Magic, Strength and Beauty:” Ansel Adams in the Southwest

,
Ansel Adams traveled to the Southwest to photograph with his son Michael, and captured famous images like “Moonrise Hernandez” while also visiting Georgia O'keeffe's land in Northern New Mexico.

Unearthing the Enigma of Moonrise Over Hernandez

,
Ansel Adams’ “Moonrise, Hernandez” stands as one of the most famous and iconic photographic images in history.

Interview with Bob Kolbrener

,
Join us in an interview with Bob Kolbrener, fine art photographer, explorer, and creative optimist.
Ansel at LeConte Lodge, Yosemite Valley, California, c. 1921. Collection of Michael and Jeanne Adams.

Ansel Adams, Photographer

, ,
By William Turnage, Reprinted courtesy of the author and Oxford University Press
Ansel Adams, photographer and environmentalist, was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Charles Hitchcock Adams, a businessman, and Olive Bray. The grandson of a wealthy timber baron, Adams grew up in a house set amid the sand dunes of the Golden Gate. When Adams was only four, an aftershock of the great earthquake and fire of 1906 threw him to the ground and badly broke his nose, distinctly marking him for life. A year later the family fortune collapsed in the financial panic of 1907, and Adams’s father spent the rest of his life doggedly but fruitlessly attempting to recoup. An only child, Adams was born when his mother was nearly forty. His relatively elderly parents, affluent family history, and the live-in presence of his mother’s maiden sister and aged father all combined to create an environment that was decidedly Victorian and both socially and emotionally conservative. Adams’s mother spent much of her time brooding and fretting over her husband’s inability to restore the Adams fortune, leaving an ambivalent imprint on her son. Charles Adams, on the other hand, deeply and patiently influenced, encouraged, and supported his son.

Half Dome, Evening, From Olmsted Point (c. 1959)

,
In the high country of Yosemite, the high-altitude Tioga Pass is Yosemite’s gateway to the East, winding amongst some of the country’s most spectacular alpine scenery.
Ansel at LeConte Lodge, Yosemite Valley, California, c. 1921. Collection of Michael and Jeanne Adams.

Conserving the Spirit of Yosemite: Ansel Adams’ Early Years in the Sierra Club

,
There is perhaps no photographer in American history who stood for the ethos of stewardship for our shared environment as much as Ansel Adams, who over the course of his decades-long career did more than just introduce Americans to their wild places, but encouraged them to protect them.